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Home | Small Carpathian - The Wines of Slovakia

Wine is stored in cellars. The cellars in Small Carpathian region differ from those in other parts of Slovakia as they are not located in vineyards but directly in the towns and villages. The largest cellars in Small Carpathians are to be found in village Častá. Those in the one of the most impressive Slovak castle Červený Kameň (known in past also as Bibersburg) are empty and one can only admire it and guess how much copper ore was stored here in the turn of Middle and New Ages when Fugger family owned the castle and manors around. The name Fugger is also connected with the wine cellar having the largest sitting capacity in the region. An old Fugger manor house is being reconstructed and the stone cellar is really impressive.

But Small Carpathians are not only wine cellars. They offer a network of marked trails for half- and all-day hikes as well as for longer trips with sleeping in mountain hotels and chalets. The newest attraction for hikers is a round-view tower on the summit of Veľká Homola at the elevation 709.2 m above sea level.

There are also about 40 – 50 km of narrow asphalt roads for biking through vineyards and woods, however not marked yet.

For history lovers there is a chain of castles, ruins and historical reconstructions of old settlements from Bratislava to Smolenice (Devín, Bratislava castle, Biely Kameň in Svätý Jur, Červený Kameň, Molpír and Smolenice chateau) as well as museums in Pezinok, Modra and Svätý Jur. Svätý Jur itself is the best preserved town on the Small Carpathian Wine Route. Its centre was listed as Municipal Historical Memorial Preserve List in 1990.

And not to forget something that attracts thousands of visitors to the region especially in the autumn. Vintage and popular feasts full of special drink of grapes just at the beginning of fermentation called burčiak (burchyyak) in Slovak, known as Sturm in German-speaking countries, of course, but not only this. Geese must fear for their lives as there is a village Slovenský Grob known for its famous goose feasts. Geese baked in a special local manner are served with thin potato pancakes called lokša (loksha), burčiak (storm) but also local quality wines. A popular phrase is that goose is served in any house in the village; nevertheless it is better to order the goose in advance in a recommended facility.

Last but not least. A unique event in Slovakia is held in the mid November – Day of Open Cellars’ Doors - when dozens of wine cellars throughout along the entire route stretching for 40 km in the region from Bratislava to Trnava are accessible for public on Friday and Saturday afternoon. For 800 Slovak crowns a visitor receives a map, a glass, a badge entitling to entry to the cellars and a voucher for bonus and can start the trip.

See the Chateau Modrá website at: www.chateaumodra.sk

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